The Thelen and Margraf Family Tree - Individuals born before 1920

Louis Joseph LA FRAMBOISE & Marguerite Magdelaine MARCOT

Husband: Louis Joseph LA FRAMBOISE (1 2 3)
   Born: 16 APR 1765               in Trois Rivieres, St. Maurice, Quebec, Canada (8 9)
Married: 11 JUL 1804 in St. Anne's de Michilimackinac, Mackinac Island, Michigan (66 67 68)
Died: about SEP 1809 in north of Grand Haven, Michigan at Mouth of the Muskegon River (10 11 12 13)
Father: Jean Baptiste LA FRAMBOISE
Mother: Marguerite LA BISSONIERE
Spouses:
   Wife: Marguerite Magdelaine MARCOT (20 21)
   Born: FEB 1780                  in Grand River, Kent Co., Michigan (29)
Died: 04 APR 1846 in Mackinac Island, Michigan (36 37 38 39)
Father: Jean Baptiste MARCOT
Mother: Marie NESKECH
Spouses:
Children
01  (F): Josephine "Josette" LA FRAMBOISE (51 52 53 54)
Born: 24 SEP 1795 in Mackinac Island, Michigan (55 56)
Died: 24 NOV 1820 in Mackinac, Michigan? (57)
Spouses: Benjamin Kendrick PIERCE
02  (M): Joseph P. LA FRAMBOISE (58 59 60 61)
Born: 1805 in Mackinac Island, Michigan (62 63)
Died: 1854 in West Newton, Wabasha Co., Minnesota (64 65)
Spouses: Daughter One of WALKING-DAY; Daughter of SLEEPY-EYE; Daughter Two of WALKING-DAY; Jane DICKSON

Additional Information

Louis Joseph LA FRAMBOISE:
Name: Joseph LA FRAMBOISE 4 5 6
Name: Joseph Francis LAFRAMBOISE 7
Cause of Death: Killed by "enraged Indian"
Died: 1806, killed on his way to present Grand Rapids, Michigan 14
Occupation: Voyager/Fur Trader in Northern Lake Michigan area 15
Buried: 1809, Grand Haven, Michigan 16 17
Christened: 16 APR 1765, Immaculate Conception Church, Champlain, St. Maurice, Trois-Rivieres, Quebec 18
Fact: 12 JUL 1804, Present at wedding of Therese Marcot and George Schindler 19

Notes:
Midwest Pioneers: Collections of the State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Vol. 18 (pg. 507)
"Joseph Laframboise was killed in 1809 near Grand River, Mich., by an Indian to whom he refused to give liquor. His wife conducted the fur-trade for many succeeding years, and was a noted Mackinac resident. See Wis. Hist. Colls., xiv, pp. 38-43."

Midwest Pioneers: Collections of the State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Vol. 14, pg. 38-39:
"Joseph Laframboise, a Frenchman, father of Josette Laframboise, dealt largely with the Indians. He was firm, determined man, and moreover was especially devout, adhering to all the rites and usages of the Catholic Church. He was particular as to the observance of the Angelus. Out in the Indian country, timed by his watch, he was as faithful in this discharge of duty as elsewhere. Whenever in any town where the bells of his church rang out three times three, at six in the morning, at noon, and at six in the evening, he and his family paid reverent heed to it. Madame Laframboise, his widow, maintaned this custom as long as she lived, and it was very impressive. The moment the Angelus sounded, she would drop her work, make the sign of the cross, and whith bowed head and crossed hands would say the shot prayers, which did not last much longer than the solemn ringing of the bells. In 1809, Laframboise left Mackinac with his wife and baby boy (the daughter being at Montreal, at school) for his usual wintering place on the upper part of the Grand river, in Michigan. They traveled in Mackinac boats, or bateaux... At the last encampment, before reaching Grand river, Laframboise, while kneeling in his tent one night saying his prayers, was shot dead by an Indian, who had previously asked for liquor and had been refused. The widowed wife, knowing that she was nearer Grand river than her own home, journeyed on taking the remains of her husband with her, and had them buried at the only town in that vicinity which was near the entrance of the river, the present day Grand Haven, Michigan."

Source: Mackinac Papers, Denissen, op. Cit., and Wisconsin Historical Collections., XIX, 158, et passim:
"First fur trade cabin in Western Michigan at Duck Lake, in Muskegon County (Duck Lake is located on Lake Michigan, probably first cabin and later cabin located in Ottawa County on Grand River), built by Joseph La Framboise the first fur trader in the area, later (1821) sold by Madame La Framboise to Rex Robinson the first white settler of Kent County."

Notes from Cindy Appleby:
"Joseph died from gunshot wound...Fur traders said the indians did it...Indians state the fur traders didn't like the money Joseph was making, took him out, got him drunk, then killed him."

Source: Women in the Wisconsin Fur Trade by Les and Jeanne Rentmeester
"Madeleine Marcotte La Frambois became an important trader in Mackinac after her husband was killed in 1809 by a drunken (Pottawattamie) Indian. She sent trade goods to members of the La Frambois family who were trading in Milwaukee and Green Bay (La Baye).

Some information about Joseph La Framboise from http://faculty-staff.ou.edu/M/Michael.L.Marcotte-/ta urey.htm

Midwest Pioneers: Collections of the State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Vol. 19, pg. 158
(Connection to Joseph La Framboise not known but interesting information nonetheless)
Alexis Laframboise was a native of Canada, where the family name was Fafard. His father, Jean Baptiste Fafard dit Laframboise, married Geneviève Bissonière in 1760. Alexis was probably born about 1763, being the second son of the family. At what time he came to the Northwest is not known, but he is supposed to have traded at Milwaukee about 1784-85. In 1792 [March 19th] he married at Mackinac Josette Adhemar; seeIbid., pp. 494, 498. Milwaukee was his wintering place for several years. Later, he sent his brother François to take charge of his goods at that point; but François was improvident, and after wasting his property was finally killed by Winnebago Indians. He left a considerable family by a Potawatomi wife. His daughter Josette was with the Kinzies in the Chicago massacre of 1812, and afterwards became the wife of Jean Baptiste Beaubien, an early Chicago pioneer. Claude, Joseph, and Alexis Laframboise, who also were settlers of early Chicago, were probably sons of François, and went thither from Milwaukee. The senior Alexis, who died as here recorded, is not known to have left descendants.

Marguerite Magdelaine MARCOT:
Name: Madeline (Marcotte) MARCOT 22 23 24 25
Name: Magdaleine MARCOTTE 26 27
Name: SHAW-WE-NO-QUA 28
Born: about 1779, "Superior Country" 30
Born: 1780, Fort St. Joseph near present day Niles, Michigan 31 32 33
Born: 1782, Makinac Island, Michigan 34 35
Died: 06 APR 1846 40
Occupation: Mackinac Island post manager for American Fur Company after husband's death 41 42
Buried: 06 APR 1846, St. Anne's Catholic Church, Mackinac Island, Michigan 43 44 45 46
Baptised: 01 AUG 1786, Makinac Island, Michigan 47 48 49
Census: 1830, Mackinac County, Michigan
Fact: Youngest child 50

Notes:
Selected Text from Article written about Madeline Marcotte in the Michigan History Magazine, Winter 1931, Volume 15, Issue 1, pg. 71-79, "A Pocahontas of Michigan", by Vivian Lyon Moore (Hillsdale):

"A figure picturesque and romantic is that of Madame La Framboise, fur trader of the north, authorized agent of the Astors, one of those who assisted in founding that immense fortune, and a very potent factor in maintainig peace and goodwill between the Indians and whites of upper Michgian in an early day. Madeline Marcotte was born in the Superior country about 1779, the daughter of a love which Jean Baptiste Marcotte cherished for the beautiful granddaughter of Returning Cloud, celebrated Ottawa chieftain. Madeline's childhood was spent among her mothers' people from whom she adopted both customs and cosutmes, and she was, in every sense, an Indian. This fact troubled the good Jesuit fathers, pioneer missionaries of the Northwest Territory, and when she was nine or ten years old, they persuaded her mother (her father had died in her infancy) to allow the child to recived some religious and other training. She justified the priest's faith in her and though she retained the full tribal garb, she became a remarkable woman, a skilled linguist, and a famous beauty.

Her French was said to be as pure as that of a Parisian, she was both entertaining and refined, and in her person she combined the symmetry and lithesomeness of the red race with the lovelines of the French, a fusion that was well-nigh irresistible. So thought young Joseph La Framboise who, in the exercise of his profession as a fur trader, met and won the fascinating half-breed. In 1796 they were married by the Jesuits and departed into the wilderness of western Michigan on the long journey which was their honeymoon. Joseph had been put in sole charge of his company's interests in that section and the young couple chose as their winter headquarters a site near the rapids of the Grand River, about where the village of Ada now stands. Children came to the LaFramboise and were, in due time, sent on to Montreal to be educated. The first baptism performed by the famous Father Gabriel Richard during his vistation at Mackinac in 1799 was that of Josette LaFramboise, their daughter.

It was 1899. ...during the evening one young brave, mad for liquor, persistently and isunltingly demanded whiskey from LaFramboise who, unflinchingly and just as persistently, refused. Brooding sullenly over the rebuff, Nequat watched the Frenchman retire to his tent for the night and, delaying only till the latter was at prayer, stole through the opening, plunged his dagger into the chest of the kneeling Joseph, and then dashed out and away. Horror-striken and stunned, Madeline could scarcely summon aid from the village and when the Pottawattomies did arrive, it was too late. LaFramboise had expired. ...at Grand Haven she buried him... Madame LaFramboise now prepared to reconstruct her life. She returned to Mackinac with her furs, obtained a trader's license from the newly organized American Fur Company, and embarked upon her own career in the Astors' interests. She continued the journeys up and down the Lake as the seasons changed, bartering with the Indians along the route, and laying up riches for her Company and herself. She labored among the tribes evenmore assiduously than before, teaching them by precept and inculcating the Christ-spirit in them by example. She maintained her husband's devout custom of saying the Angelus as long as she lived and wherever she might be. On Mackinac Island she erected a home for herself which she left in care of her loyal servants during her annal absences. Her wealth she used for great good. In shore she acquired distinction and became a personage in that picturesque community."


Source: Midwest Pioneers: Collections of the State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Volume 14
REMINISCENCES OF EARLY DAYS ON MACKINAC page 39-41: (Also in book "Historic Mackinac" by Edwin O. Wood, Vol. 2, 1918, pg. 125-127)
"Joseph Laframboise, a Frenchman, father of Josette Laframboise, dealt largely with the Indians. He was firm, determined man, and moreover was especially devout, adhering to all the rites and usages of the Catholic Church. He was especially particular as to the observance of the Angelus. Out in the Indian country, timed by his watch, he was as faithful in this discharge of duty as elsewhere. Whenever in any town where the bells of his church rang out three times three,--at six in the morning, at noon, and at six in the evening,--he and his family paid reverent heed to it. Madame Laframboise, his widow, maintained this custom as long as she lived, and it was very impressive. The moment the Angelus sounded, she would drop her work, make the sign of the cross, and with bowed head and crossed hands would say the short prayers, which did not last much longer than the solemn ringing of the bells.

In 1809, Laframboise left Mackinac with his wife and baby-boy (the daughter being at Montreal, at school) for his usual wintering place on the upper part of Grand river, in Michigan. They traveled in Mackinac boats, or bateaux. There were two boats, with a crew of six men to each. Their were also accompanied by their servants,--old Angelique, a slave, and her son, Louizon--all of whom made a large party. At the last encampment, before reaching Grand[p.39] river, Laframboise, while kneeling in his tent one night saying his prayers, was shot dead by an Indian, who had previously asked for liquor and had been refused. The widowed wife, knowing that she was nearer Grand river than her own home, journeyed on, taking the remains of her husband with her, and had them buried at the only town in that vicinity. which was near the entrance of the river--the present Grand Haven, Mich. Now was developed the unselfish devotion of her servant, Angelique, whose faithfulness was displayed in many ways through the deep affliction which had fallen upon her mistress. She greatly endeared herself to Madame Laframboise, and was ever after her constant companion in all journeyings, Madame becoming in time very dependent upon her; the tie that bound them together remained unbroken until the death of the mistress.

After Madame Laframboise had laid away her husband, she proceeded to her place of business. Here she remained until spring, trading with the Indians. Then she returned to Mackinac and procured a license as a trader, and added much to her already large fortune. In the course of that winter the Indians captured the murderer of Laframboise, and, bringing him to her, desired that she should decide his fate,--whether he should be shot or burned. Madame addressed them eloquently, referring, in words profoundly touching, to her dead husband, his piety, and his good deeds. Then, displaying in her forgiving spirit a most Christ-like quality, she continued: "I will do as I know he would do, could he now speak to you; I will forgive him, and leave him to the Great Spirit. He will do what is right." She never again saw that man. Madame Laframboise would in June return with her furs to Mackinac. The servants whom she left in care of her home there, would have it in readiness upon her arrival, and here she would keep house for about three months and then go back to her work. Among these servants was one notably faithful, Geneviéve Maranda, who remained with her until her death.

Madame Laframboise was a remarkable woman in many ways. As long as her father, Jean Baptiste Marcotte, lived, his children, when old enough, were sent to Montreal be educated. But she and her sister, Grandmother Schindler, did not share these advantages, they being the youngest of the family, and the father dying when Madame Laframboise was but three months old. Her mother was of chiefly blood, being the daughter of Ke-wi-na-quot (Returning Cloud), one of the most powerful chiefs of the Ottawa tribe. She had no book-lore, but many might be proud of her attainments. She spoke French easily, having learned it from her husband. All conversation in that day was as a rule held in French. Robert Stuart, a Scotchman, who was educated in Paris, used to say that her diction was as pure as that of a Parisian. She was a graceful and refined person, and remarkably entertaining. She always wore the full Indian costume, and there was at that time no better fur trader than she. She had both the love and respect of the Indians that her husband had had before her. She, indeed, had no fear of the Indians, no matter what their condition; she was always able to control them.

In May 1817, Madame Laframboise arrived in Mackinac by bateau with her furs. She then hired a birch-bark canoe and Indian crew to take her to Montreal, where she when [p.41] to place her boy in school. Her daughter was to be married that summer, but had to await her mothers return. As soon as the mother did return, the wedding took place...The mother and aunt (Madame Schindler) were present in full Indian costume.

Madame Laframboise lived in her new home for several years. It was there that I and my children were made happy in after years. To visit at that home, also, came Madame's grand-daughter, Miss Harriet Pierce, who afterwards[p.43] married an army officer. She, too, died young. Her daughter, who is still living, is the wife of an officer in the army. The son, who was placed at school at Montreal, came home in due time and became a fur trader, married out in the Western country, and died there about 1854, leaving a large family. Madame Laframboise died April 4, 1846, aged 66 years."

Source: Women in the Wisconsin Fur Trade by Les and Jeanne Rentmeester
"Madeleine Marcotte La Framois became an important trader in Mackinac after her husband was killed in 1809 by a drunken (Pottawattamie) Indian. She sent trade goods to members of the La Framois family who were trading in Milwaukee and Green Bay (La Baye).

FamilySearch International Genealogical Index (LDS homepage) Record:
Batch # F8440406, Sheet #22
Magdelaine Marcott
Marriage: Spouse: Lewis Joseph Laframboise
Marriage: Abt. 1806 Mackinac', 'Michigan

FamilySearch International Genealogical Index (LDS homepage) Record:
Batch # F867054, Sheet #19
Madeleine Marcotte
Event: Misc: Abt 1774 of,, Quebec
Parents: Father: Jean Baptiste Marcotte
Mother: Marie Neskesh

FamilySearch International Genealogical Index (LDS homepage) Record:
Film # 1760956
Madeleine Marcotte
Marriage: Spouse: Joseph Framboise
Marriage : 11 Jul 1804 Mackinac', 'Michigan

From Michigan Marriages From 18040 to 1899, Surnames Beginning with E to G:
Fafard Laframboise, Joseph marr. Marcot, Marguerite M. 11/07/1804 (July 11, 1804)

From the St. Anne's Catholic Church, Mackinaw Island, Michigan web site history section: (http://steanne.cjb.net/)
"As church authorities sent only visiting clergy to Mackinac, it fell to the steadfast dedication of Ste. Anne’s parishioners to sustain the parish through these difficult times. Magdelaine Laframboise, a prominent Mackinac Island fur trader of mixed Ottawa and French blood, provided crucial leadership and support during the first half of the nineteenth century. Her devotion is well documented in the parish register where she frequently appears as a godmother to the baptized and witness at marriages. Madame” Laframboise donated the property adjacent to her home when parish leaders decided to move the church and priest’s house from their original location in the village to the current site on the east side of the island harbor in the mid 1820s. In exchange for her gift of land, Laframboise asked to be buried beneath the altar at the end of her life. Father Henri Van Renterghem honored her request when she died in 1846."

From the 1830 Census of Mackinac County, Michigan:
Madelaine Laframboise, in household 1 male and 2 females 10 to 15 years old, 1 female 15 to 20 years old, 1 female 20 to 30 years old, and one female 50 to 60 years old

Wisconsin Historical Collections: American Fur Company Employees 1818-1819:
When engaged: Aug 1818, Laframboise, Madame, Period: 1 year, Capacity: Trader, Where engaged: Mackinac, Wages: $500, Where employed: Grand River, Remarks: Grand River; $3000


Marriage Notes
Married: 1794, Unknown Frontier Catholic Mission 69 70 71
Married: 1796, Married by Jesuits 72

Source: Mackinac Register 1695-1888, CD of church records from St. Anne's Church, Mackinac Island, Michigan (scanned copy of original record), marriage record of Joseph Laframboise and Marguerite Magdelaine Marcot, July 11, 1804:

"We the undersigned priest, missionary at Michilimackina after dispensation from three bands between Joseph Laframboise, son of Jean Baptiste la Framboise and of Marguerite La Bissoniere, deceased, of the one part, and Marguerite Magdelaine Marcot, daughter of Jean Baptiste Marcot and of Marie Neskesh, of the other part received their mutual marriage consent ... in the presence of Michel Lacroix, of Jean Baptisted Lemoine, of Charles Chandonnet, and of Antoine Guillory who signed with us. J. Dilhet, missionary priest, J. Baptiste Lemoine; Joseph Laframboise; Magdelaine Marcot (+ her mark); M Lacrois; Antoine Guillory; C. Chandonnet."

Source of some marriage information: Midwest Pioneers: Collections of the State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Volume 14, pg. 39.

Lowell, Michigan Centennia Record, 1831-1931, California State Library, Sutro, F 574 L68 L6:
"Madame Marcotte, at the age of about nine, received religious and other training by Jesuit Fathers, pioneer missionaries of the Northwest. In 1796, Joseph LaFramboise and Madeline Marcotte were married by the Jesuits and departed into the wilderness of western Michigan, on the long journey which was their honeymoon."

Genforum Web Message Board Posting, Feb. 4, 1999: by Tim Matthews:
Title: Benjamin Kendrick Pierce by David Salyers
"The marriage of Josephine Lafrombrose to Captain Benjamin K. Pierce produced 3 children. Harriet was first born, then in 1819 his son Daniel was born. The last child was Langdon who died within days of birth and Josephine died then also. Daniel is overlooked quite a bit but he did exist. The marriage took place on Mackenaw Island in Michigan as Captain Pierce was in command of Fort Mackenaw. Josephine was the daughter of Magnaline Marcotte and Joseph Lafrombrose (Joseph was a Voyager and was killed by a Ottowa Indian on the mouth of the Muskegon River because he didn't give the warrior any whisky, he was French Arcanian). Magnaline was the daugher of Marie Nekesh and Jean Baptiste marcotte (another French Arcanian fur trader). Marie was the daughter of an Ottowa Chief named Returning Cloud. Daniel was raised by his grandmother Magnaline and worked with her in the fur trade. He married Lucretia Wadkins and they had 5 children, Charles (my ancestor), Lyman, William, Cinthia, and Daniel. Daniel Sr. died in 1866.

Genforum Web Message Board Posting by Karen on February 25, 1999: Reply to message above:
"According to the Wisconsin Historical Collection Vol. XIX, Joseph Fafard-LaFramboise m. Madelaine Marcot(te) of the Courtes Oreilles), she was the dau. of Jean Baptiste Marcot and Marie Nesketch. Their children were Josette not Josephine; and son Joseph, Jr. Josette was born 24 Sept 1795, Bap. 07 Jul 1799 Mackinac Island, and died four years later per child birth. She lost a son. She married Capt. Benjamin K. Pierce in 1817. Josette is buried with her mother next to Ste. Anne's Catholic Church on Mackinac Island. For more info re Pierce se Vol XIV, pp. 36-43.

Genforum Web Message Board Posting by Tim Matthews on March 1, 1999 in reply to message above:
"Josette's grave stone on the 'island' calls her Josephine, and some records call her by that name, others by Josette. Take your pick. Yes she died giving birth to her second son Langdon, but she had at least two other children by that time, Hariet and Daniel. The 1820 Census reporte indicates that there were three children living with Captain Pierce and his wife, two females and one male. She died in 1821 giving birth to a son. And by the way Marie Neckesh's father was Returning Cloud."


Footnotes

  1. Early Marriages of Mackinac County, http://www.rootsweb.com/~mimackin/marriage.html [237].
  2. Collections of the State Historical Society of Wisconsin (Wisconsin Historical Collections), 1910, Vol. XIX, Mackinac Reg. of Bapt. and Interments [165].
    1695-1821, St. Anne of Michilimackinac; "Joseph Laframbosie" (father of Josette who was baptised).
  3. Mackinac Register 1695-1888, CD of church records from St. Anne's Church, Mackinac Island, Michigan (scanned copy of original record) [400].
    Listed as father of Josette. Baptism record of Josette Laframboise, born Sept 24, 1795, baptised July 7, 1799, daughter of Joseph Lafromboise and Madelaine of the nation of the coutres oreilles.
  4. Michigan History Magazine, Winter 1931, Vol. 15, Issue 1 [442].
  5. 1208635.GED from Ancestry.com World Family Tree, Information taken from the http://faculty-staff.ou.edu/M/Michael.L.Marcotte-/ta urey.htm [15].
  6. "Annels of Fort Mackinac" by Dwight H. Kelton in 1882, reprinted 1992 Mackinac State Historic Park (http://www3.sympatico.ca/sneakers/catholic.htm) [1].
  7. The Monthly South Dakotan, March 1901, No. 11, Third Year, pg. 353-358, "Joseph LaFramboise, First Settler (in Watertown, SD Library collection) [966].
  8. Cindy Appleby's research at http://chandonai.tripod.com/in2.html [159].
  9. Records from Immaculate Conception Church, Trois-Rivieres, St. Maurice, Quebec; (1634-1876) B/M/S, FHL SLC film # 1298975 and 1298968 [611].
  10. Cindy Appleby's research at http://chandonai.tripod.com/in2.html [159].
  11. Midwest Pioneers: Collections of the State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Volume 14, Reminiscences of Mrs. Elizabeth Therese Baird [460], pg. 39.
  12. Registre de La Mission, St. Ignace (englise St. Anne), Michilimackinac, 1695-1799; FHL SLC film #1026608 [615].
  13. Mackinac Register 1695-1888, CD of church records from St. Anne's Church, Mackinac Island, Michigan (scanned copy of original record) [400].
    citation under marriage record on English translation in Wisconsin State Historical Collection, Volume 18, pg. 506 says Joseph LaFramboise was killed in 1809 near Grand River Michigan by and Inidan to whom he refused to give liquor.
  14. "Therese Schindler" by John E. McDowell, Wisconsin Magazine of History, Vol. 61, No. 2, Winter 1977-1978, pg. 125-143, State Historical Society of WI [9].
  15. Ibid.
    "member of a prominent trading family who operated in the area surrounding northern Lake Michigan."
  16. Michigan History Magazine, Winter 1931, Vol. 15, Issue 1 [442].
  17. Midwest Pioneers: Collections of the State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Volume 14, Reminiscences of Mrs. Elizabeth Therese Baird [460], pg. 39.
  18. Records from Immaculate Conception Church, Trois-Rivieres, St. Maurice, Quebec; (1634-1876) B/M/S, FHL SLC film # 1298975 and 1298968 [611].
  19. "Therese Schindler" by John E. McDowell, Wisconsin Magazine of History, Vol. 61, No. 2, Winter 1977-1978, pg. 125-143, State Historical Society of WI [9].
  20. Early Marriages of Mackinac County, http://www.rootsweb.com/~mimackin/marriage.html [237].
  21. Mackinac Register 1695-1888, CD of church records from St. Anne's Church, Mackinac Island, Michigan (scanned copy of original record) [400].
    marriage record of Joseph Laframboise and Marguerite Magdelaine Marcot; Magdelaine Marcot baptism record.
  22. Michigan History Magazine, Winter 1931, Vol. 15, Issue 1 [442].
  23. 1830 Federal Census of Michlimackinac County, Michigan [21].
  24. The Monthly South Dakotan, March 1901, No. 11, Third Year, pg. 353-358, "Joseph LaFramboise, First Settler (in Watertown, SD Library collection) [966].
    "Madaline Marcotta."
  25. "Therese Schindler" by John E. McDowell, Wisconsin Magazine of History, Vol. 61, No. 2, Winter 1977-1978, pg. 125-143, State Historical Society of WI [9].
    "Madeline La Framboise."
  26. 1208635.GED from Ancestry.com World Family Tree, Information taken from the http://faculty-staff.ou.edu/M/Michael.L.Marcotte-/ta urey.htm [15].
    Date of Import: Mar 21, 2001.
  27. "Annels of Fort Mackinac" by Dwight H. Kelton in 1882, reprinted 1992 Mackinac State Historic Park (http://www3.sympatico.ca/sneakers/catholic.htm) [1].
  28. Indian Affairs: Laws and Treaties. Vol. II (Treaties). Charles J. Kappler. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1904. Treaty with the Ottawa, 1821 [362].
    Lists mother of Joseph La Framboise as Shaw-we-no-qua.
  29. Mackinac Register 1695-1888, CD of church records from St. Anne's Church, Mackinac Island, Michigan (scanned copy of original record) [400].
    Magdelaine Marcot's baptism record says she was about 6 years old at the time of her baptism.
  30. Michigan History Magazine, Winter 1931, Vol. 15, Issue 1 [442].
  31. Cindy Appleby's research at http://chandonai.tripod.com/in2.html [159].
  32. Midwest Pioneers: Collections of the State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Volume 14, Reminiscences of Mrs. Elizabeth Therese Baird [460], pg. 43 (says age 66 at time of death).
  33. Unknown [990].
    "christened Aug 1, 1786 at age 6 years."
  34. www.FamilySearch.org LDS [1042].
    Batch number: 8440406
    Sheet #28
    Birth Parents listed as Jean Babtiste Marcott and Marie Neshkesh.
  35. Midwest Pioneers: Collections of the State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Volume 14, Reminiscences of Mrs. Elizabeth Therese Baird [460], pg. 40 states Madeline (Madame Laframboise) was only three months old when her father died.
  36. Cindy Appleby's research at http://chandonai.tripod.com/in2.html [159].
  37. Michigan History Magazine, Winter 1931, Vol. 15, Issue 1 [442].
  38. Midwest Pioneers: Collections of the State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Volume 14, Reminiscences of Mrs. Elizabeth Therese Baird [460], pg. 43 (aged 66 years at time of death).
  39. "Therese Schindler" by John E. McDowell, Wisconsin Magazine of History, Vol. 61, No. 2, Winter 1977-1978, pg. 125-143, State Historical Society of WI [9].
  40. Mackinac Register 1695-1888, Church records on CD from St. Anne's Catholic Church, P.O. Box 537, Mackinac Island, Michigan, 49757 [401].
    "Magdelena Marcott widow of Josephi Laframboise, die 6 April 1846."
  41. Michigan History Magazine, Winter 1931, Vol. 15, Issue 1 [442].
  42. The Monthly South Dakotan, March 1901, No. 11, Third Year, pg. 353-358, "Joseph LaFramboise, First Settler (in Watertown, SD Library collection) [966].
  43. Cindy Appleby's research at http://chandonai.tripod.com/in2.html [159].
  44. Michigan History Magazine, Winter 1931, Vol. 15, Issue 1 [442].
  45. History on the St. Anne's Catholic Church, Mackinaw Island, Michigan Web Site http://steanne.cjb.net/ [329].
  46. "Therese Schindler" by John E. McDowell, Wisconsin Magazine of History, Vol. 61, No. 2, Winter 1977-1978, pg. 125-143, State Historical Society of WI [9].
    Therese and her daughter were buried beneath the altar of St. Anne's on Mackinac Island.
  47. www.FamilySearch.org LDS [1042], Batch number 7130137, sheet 38.
    "christened Aug 1, 1786 at age 6 years."
  48. Cindy Appleby's research at http://chandonai.tripod.com/in2.html [159].
  49. "Therese Schindler" by John E. McDowell, Wisconsin Magazine of History, Vol. 61, No. 2, Winter 1977-1978, pg. 125-143, State Historical Society of WI [9].
    Baptised when mother was visiting Mackinac Island.
  50. Ibid.
  51. Early Marriages of Mackinac County, http://www.rootsweb.com/~mimackin/marriage.html [237].
  52. www.FamilySearch.org LDS [1042].
    David A. Armour, biographical sketch, FHL SLC US/CAN 971.D3 dv.3 "Josette Fafard."
  53. The Monthly South Dakotan, March 1901, No. 11, Third Year, pg. 353-358, "Joseph LaFramboise, First Settler (in Watertown, SD Library collection) [966].
    "Josette LaFramboise."
  54. Mackinac Register 1695-1888, CD of church records from St. Anne's Church, Mackinac Island, Michigan (scanned copy of original record) [400].
    Baptism record of Josette Laframboise, born Sept 24, 1795, baptised July 7, 1799, daughter of Joseph Lafromboise and Madelaine of the nation of the coutres oreilles.
  55. French Canadian Fur Traders - LaFromboise, Half Breed/Metis Records, Manitoba Parish Records, No. Dakota-Minn Records, FHL SLC Film #159571 [267].
  56. Mackinac Register 1695-1888, CD of church records from St. Anne's Church, Mackinac Island, Michigan (scanned copy of original record) [400].
    Baptism record of Josette Laframboise, born Sept 24, 1795, baptised July 7, 1799, daughter of Joseph Lafromboise and Madelaine of the nation of the coutres oreilles.
  57. Michigan History Magazine, Winter 1931, Vol. 15, Issue 1 [442].
  58. Cindy Appleby's research at http://chandonai.tripod.com/in2.html [159].
    "Joseph Framboise."
  59. www.FamilySearch.org LDS [1042].
    David A. Armour, biographical sketch, FHL SLC US/CAN 971.D3 dv.3; "Joseph P. Fafard."
  60. The Monthly South Dakotan, March 1901, No. 11, Third Year, pg. 353-358, "Joseph LaFramboise, First Settler (in Watertown, SD Library collection) [966].
    by Doane Robinson.
  61. "Therese Schindler" by John E. McDowell, Wisconsin Magazine of History, Vol. 61, No. 2, Winter 1977-1978, pg. 125-143, State Historical Society of WI [9].
  62. www.FamilySearch.org LDS [1042].
    David A. Armour, biographical sketch, FHL SLC US/CAN 971.D3 dv.3, lists date of birth as 1805.
  63. The Monthly South Dakotan, March 1901, No. 11, Third Year, pg. 353-358, "Joseph LaFramboise, First Settler (in Watertown, SD Library collection) [966].
    "born at Michilimacinac Island."
  64. Midwest Pioneers: Collections of the State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Volume 14, Reminiscences of Mrs. Elizabeth Therese Baird [460], pg. 43.
    died in "Western Country."
  65. The Monthly South Dakotan, March 1901, No. 11, Third Year, pg. 353-358, "Joseph LaFramboise, First Settler (in Watertown, SD Library collection) [966].
    "He died in 1854 at his home where he finally settled in 1839, at West Newton, MN."
  66. www.FamilySearch.org LDS [1042], Film number 1760956.
    David A. Armour, biographical sketch, FHL SLC US/CAN 971.D3 dv.3.
  67. Early Marriages of Mackinac County, http://www.rootsweb.com/~mimackin/marriage.html [237].
  68. Mackinac Register 1695-1888, CD of church records from St. Anne's Church, Mackinac Island, Michigan (scanned copy of original record) [400].
    marriage record of Joseph Laframboise and Marguerite Marcot.
  69. Cindy Appleby's research at http://chandonai.tripod.com/in2.html [159].
  70. www.FamilySearch.org LDS [1042].
    David A. Armour, biographical sketch, FHL SLC US/CAN 971.D3 dv.3.
  71. "Therese Schindler" by John E. McDowell, Wisconsin Magazine of History, Vol. 61, No. 2, Winter 1977-1978, pg. 125-143, State Historical Society of WI [9].
  72. Michigan History Magazine, Winter 1931, Vol. 15, Issue 1 [442].

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Revised: November 16, 2009